Small Family Farm CSA

We Dig Vegetables

 

June Seventh

A new season dawns, fresh and new like a sunrise.   Bright.  Promising.  Energizing.  I am just as excited for this season as I was for our very first CSA delivery season in 2006.  Nope, that’s not true.  I have more excitement, more confidence, more help and less stress!DSC 0153

Our 12th season is off to a fantastic start.  All of the crops are going into the ground on schedule.  The rains have been timely (except for right about now we are already praying for rain), and there has been very little severe weather to threaten damaging our tender Spring crops. 

Tender is another word to describe a new season.  Everything is new and young and succulent.  The snap peas are just beginning to wrap their first tendrils around the trellising.  The winter squash, melon and cucurbit plants are all still under their baby blankets of remay to protect them from the harsh winds, sun and bugs.  And the Spring Lettuce is so tender and buttery that it pales my impression of all other lettuce for the rest of the year.  Tender as well in that there are still baby birds in their nests that haven’t flown yet.  Our skin is still white-ish from a winter’s thick cover and prone to burning.  Even the soil is tender and freshly tilled, vulnerable to erosion from wind or rain. 

A new season is tender and new, but it is somehow also wild and free and un-predictable.  A new season feels even a bit scary (says the farmer who has lived through floods and droughts).  It feels like a shot out of a cannon.  It feels like an explosion of potential and possibility. 

A season is old and knowing as well in that even though it is new and fresh, it knows just what to do.  The plants and animals behave in the ancient ways they always have and always will behave.  The trees bud without que.  The birds return and nest without instruction.  The pepper seed germinates and grows into the variety we expect it to.  How lovely this reliability and predictability amidst the uncertainty of when it will rain next and will the crops produce well this year? 

Lovely is the CSA model.  This well-organized and beautiful relationship between farmers and eaters.  A reliable, secure and safe way to know where your food is coming from, the transparency behind who and how it is grown, and also the open invitation to know as much as you wish about your food and farm.  I feel thankful for you, the person who wishes to eat fresh, local, organic produce and wishes to know their farmer.  I feel thankful for your reliable, continued support that will last throughout the entire 2017 season.  You can count on the same from us! 

Soooo....What's in the Box???

Pac Choi-  This is an asian vegetable that is wonderful in stir fry or also made into an asian slaw.  The stalks are crisp and tender and the leaves are just as edible and flavorful!  Stores best in a plastic bag in the fridge.  

Pannise Oakleaf Lettuce-  A gorgeous oakleaf Spring lettuce.  These fun and fancy oakleaf varieties really only grow well in this area in the Spring when it's not too hot.  We love how tender and green this lettuce is!  Make a beautiful salad with this!  Stores best in a plastic bag in the fridge.  Although I'm sure you won't need to think about storing this lettuce long!  

Asparagus-  Asparagus is the only crop that we actually buy each year.  We have an amish friend with a very large patch of certified organic Asparagus.  This was all picked fresh on Tuesday morning and packed out by his daughters.  He says it hasn't been a very good aspargus year since it has been cooler.  This is more of a straight run with a mix of #1 and #2 quality.  Our amish farmer, Elmer, says this is the best he could offer us this year.  In past years we have gotten beautiful #1 looking asparagus from him, but this year hasn't been his best year.  Asparagus coming again next week!

Spinach-  A quarter pound of perfect, baby spinach.  I know this will go quickly at home as well!  

Rhubarb-  A half pound of rhubarb per member.  The rhubarb plants on our farm are only a few years old, so we are still getting a big mix of smaller and larger stalks.  No matter the color (red or green) or size (large or small),  they are all perfectly edible and would make a wonderful cobbler!  Will keep best in a plastic bag in the fridge.  oakleaf

Shallots-  Slightly less than a half pound bag of overwintered shallots.  Overwintered means that these puppies were grown last summer on this farm, cured, cleaned and put into storage for the winter and they're stil holding up fabulously.  Since they have been in cold storage for so long they will want to sprout if left out on your countertop.  We recommend keeping them in your fridge until you plan to use them.  Use them up quick more yummy veggies coming soon!  

Pea Shoots-  Did you know you could eat these?  Yes, it's true!  These are only a little bigger than what we might have liked them to be so their stalks might be a bit chewey.  But the leaves and tendrils have all the flavors of Spring and Snap Peas that we know and love!  Keeps best in a plastic bag in the fridge.  You can snap the leaves off and toss them in a salad.  You can mix them in a pesto or stir fry or do whatever you wish with them!  

Arugula-  Very small bunches of Arugula.  We thought we would get in there and harvest this Arugula while it was very young and tender and not so spicy or turn bitter from the heat.  Arugula really only grows well in the cool-ness of the Spring and Fall when it won't bolt or be too spicy.  Enjoy the tenderness of this unique item!  I'm thinking of making a bacon/arugula pizza!  

Swiss Chard-  The Swiss Chard was looking so beautiful we had to harvest this for you!  Swiss Chard is in the same family as spinach, so use the greens in a fritatta, green smoothie, stir-fry or however else you might use spinach.  DSC 0169

Cherry Bell Radishes-  Perfect cherry bell radishes.  Not too spicy.  Not too big.  Not woody at all.  Some are a bit on the small side (but that's better than being too big), and the flavor is perfect!  

Herb Packs-  These cute little packs are for you to transplant out into a little space in your yard or in little pots near your kitchen.  We believe in cooking with fresh herbs, so we provided you here with little plants so you can always snag a sprig of fresh thyme or oregano or parslely now and then throughout the season for cooking with fresh herbs!  Transplant into the ground or a pot with plenty of fresh, fertile, organic soil mix and allow to grow in a full-sun space.  

Next Week's Best Guess:  Pac Choie, Lettuce, Asparagus, Rhubarb, Shannots, pea shoots, arugula, kale cherry bell radishes, herb packs.  

Recipes:

Sesame Ginger Pac Choi Salad

Pasta Salad with Goat Cheese and Arugula

Rhubarb Coffee Cake

Swiss Chard Fritatta

 

June Fourteenth

One of the beautiful things about belonging to a CSA farm is the opportunity to know your farmer.  A different experience than what we get at a store.  We know our store-owners (sometimes).  We know our neighborhoods that we shop in.  We might even know the friendly cashiers or the produce buyers if we’re really regulars somewhere.  But knowing the farmer or better still, the faces of the actual people who work in the fields and touch the food is a whole new level.  A more intimate level that may make you feel excited to explore or may make you feel uncomfortable. 

I encourage you to look a little closer this summer.  Read the newsletters, check out the pictures, come to the farm events, imprint in your mind the look of the place where the food is grown.  Create an image with a collage of faces and land-marks and stories that becomes your farm.  For this summer or for every summer, you will have a comforting little family farm in a warm place in your chest set high up on top of a ridge in southwest Wisconsin where your food comes from.DSC 0166 1

A brief history about Adam and I.  We started our little CSA with 23 members in 2006.  We were full of energy, excitement and ideas and 100% committed to the idea of running a CSA farm.  We had very little infrastructure, help or money.  But we persevered, survived and grew!  Each year our little CSA grew from 23 to 60 to 90 to 100 to 150 to 200 CSA members and so on.   We’re at a cozy little 275 this year that keeps our farm feeling sustainable.  This would be our 12th growing season.  We are now married with two children and living our dream.  For help we have a fantastic crew of 31 Worker Shares, 4 employees, and my very helpful and involved mother who lives next door in her own home and on her own 5 acres.  There’s nothing like a grandma nearby!

Running a farm is damn hard work though.  It’s almost a phenomenon that Adam and I found each other at the times of our lives that we did and that our marriage happily thrives, even through the stress of running a farm like this.  My impression is that very few people are interested in working this hard for the living we earn or living this remotely.  But us, we feel a little like we’ve got something secret and special in our pockets.  Like we’ve just unwrapped the chocolate bar with the golden wrapper.  I dunno.  Maybe the joke is on us.  But it’s working!  That’s good! 

The farm has grown to where we have the infrastructure and the help we need to get the work done.  We have a stronger CSA member base (that’s you!) and we have some years of experience now to genuinely help us in our decision making processes.  We have room for growth in our work/life balance.  I know farmers who never-ever get better at this.  They go to their graves wishing they hadn’t worked so much and had spent more time with their families.  But I’m determined to solve this little problem.  It’s only been 12 years.  Give us another 12 and I think we’ll get there! 

Come to the farm this Saturday!  We are having our Spring Strawberry Picking Event with a tractor-pull ride farm tour and potluck towards the end.  Bring the kids, your parents, Frisbees, sun hats, a dish to pass and bucket to fill with strawberries!  We are selling the you-pick strawberries for $3/lb.  But pick as many as you like-enough to make Dad a fresh strawberry cream pie for Father’s Day on Sunday! DSC 0158

Strawberry Picking from 2:00-3:30pm

Farm Tour from 4:00-5:00pm

Pot-Luck Dinner from 5:00-6:00pm

Sooo....What's in the Box???

Curly Green Kale-  A very young and tender bunch of curly green kale.  This was the first picking from this patch and the leaves are very succulent!  Is Kale new to you?  This a frequent item in CSA boxes throughout the summer.  We typically offer a cooking green each week.  Watch for fun, delicious and easy recipe ideas for your cooking greens each week, and PLEASE send me your tried and true and I would love to share them with everyone!  Stores best in a plastic bag in the fridge.  

Arugula-  The arugula grew up a bit from last week.  The bunches are a little bigger than they were last week.  Lots of positive feedback on the arugula!  It grows well in the Spring and Fall, but does not tolerate summer heat very well so you may not see it again until late summer CSA boxes.  Great on pizza, mixed into salads, tossed with pasta or however you like it to get it into your belly!  Stores best in a plastic bag in the fridge to preserve moisture.  

Panise Green Oakleaf Lettuce-  A tender and very buttery Spring Oakleaf lettuce.  This lettuce was grown in a greenhouse to ensure an early harvest for the first couple CSA boxes.  Stores best in a plastic bag in the fridge to preserve moisture.  

Pac Choi-  This unique asia vegetable has the most juicy, watery stems/stalks!  It is very lovely and mild!  An asian green that makes a great asain salad or stir-fry.  

Asparagus-  Asparagus is the only crop that we actually buy each year.  We have an amish friend with a very large patch of certified organic Asparagus.  This was all picked fresh on Tuesday morning and packed out by his daughters.  He says it hasn't been a very good aspargus year since it has been cooler.  This is more of a straight run with a mix of #1 and #2 quality.  Our amish farmer, Elmer, says this is the best he could offer us this year.  In past years we have gotten beautiful #1 looking asparagus from him, but this year hasn't been his best year.  The final Asparagus giving.  

Spinach-  A very nice half pound bag of spinach for everyone this week!  Still very tender and wonderful though.  We put some on pizza, some in salad, and some in our eggs.  Eat is everyway!

Rhubarb-  The final giving of Rhubarb for this year.  Our rhubarb plants are still very young.  We're not sure why, but some of them have very thin stalks and we get a very wide range in sizes at harvest.  Since we just give it in the Spring, we clean most of the stalks off of the plants for just a few givings, and they have the rest of the year to regenerate their roots.  Although some of them are skinney stalks, they are still very edible in recipes!DSC 0166

Cherry Bell Radish-  A teeny bit spicier this week than last.  The greens on the radishes are perfectly edible and delectible.  Toss the greens in with your salad, wilt them into a stir fry or toss them with rice.  Lots of creative ways to incorporate more greens into your diet!  

Overwintered Shallots-  Slightly less than a half pound bag of overwintered shallots.  Overwintered means that these puppies were grown last summer on this farm, cured, cleaned and put into storage for the winter and they're stil holding up fabulously.  Since they have been in cold storage for so long they will want to sprout if left out on your countertop.  We recommend keeping them in your fridge until you plan to use them.  Use them up quick-more yummy veggies coming soon!  

Pea Shoots-  Did you know you could eat these?  Yes, it's true!  These are only a little bigger than what we might have liked them to be so their stalks might be a bit chewey.  But the leaves and tendrils have all the flavors of Spring and Snap Peas that we know and love!  Keeps best in a plastic bag in the fridge.  You can snap the leaves off and toss them in a salad.  You can mix them in a pesto or stir fry or do whatever you wish with them!  

Herb Pack-  These cute little packs are for you to transplant out into a little space in your yard or in little pots near your kitchen.  We believe in cooking with fresh herbs, so we provided you here with little plants so you can always snag a sprig of fresh thyme or oregano or parslely or basil now and then throughout the season for cooking with fresh herbs!  Transplant into the ground or a pot with plenty of fresh, fertile, organic soil mix and allow to grow in a full-sun space.  Be sure there is plenty of water at transplant!

Next Week's Best Guess:

Salad turnips, lettuce x 2, cilantro, strawberry quarts, garlic scapes, kohlrabi, collards, maybe zucchini and summer squash, maybe broccoli, maybe spinach

Recipes

Chocolate Rhubarb Cake

Cream Cheese Radish Dip

Ricotta, Lemon and Arugula Quiche

Pac Choi Stir Fry

June Twenty First

Strawberries are here!  Strawberries are something we were reluctant to take on in the early years of our farm.  We just didn’t know the process - the spacing at which to plant them, what varieties, how far apart are the rows?  How many plants to put in? 

But four years ago we decided that we were no longer afraid!  We had a cultivating tractor (to help keep the rows weeded).  We had done our research and we knew that having our own home-grown strawberries for our CSA members would be a huge hit!  The very next year we had more berries than what we could pick.  We quickly learned that we would need to bring in extra workers during Strawberry season to help get the highly perishable berries picked fast. DSC 0169

You will notice that our local strawberries may look and taste much different from strawberries you buy from the store brought in from California.  The golden state grows them as annuals and re-plants them every year on plastic with a drip-line and fertilizer feed.  On our farm we plant them the first year and don’t harvest until the second year.  We pick the same patch for three years and then turn it under.  The berries are larger the first year and seem to go down in size and production the following two years, but still produce somewhat heavily. 

We are picking from two different patches this season.  One variety is Honey-O and the other variety is Darselect.  At the end of each season we blanket the strawberry field with a fodder mulch (some farms use oat straw) to protect the roots from the harsh Wisconsin winters.  In the Spring the mulch is raked back to expose the mother plant and at that time the plants emerge and begin to sprawl out. 

Strawberries are said to have gotten their name because the plant vines out and sends runners in every direction multiplying with new plants growing in every direction.  The plants runners are “strewn” about straying and strewing in all directions.  A less popular theory is that all of the tiny seeds on the surface of the berry resemble straw or chaff or mote – describing the appearance of the achenes (little seeds) all over the berries.  In England, where the word “strawberry” was said to have originated, they grew in the wild long before they were cultivated or farmed in such a way that straw was applied to the patches. DSC 0179

On our farm we harvest strawberries when they are all the way ripe.  We do not pick under-ripe berries which makes them a highly perishable product.  Once they are harvested, we put them in our walk-in cooler immediately and there they sit until delivery day.  Once they have been removed from the cooler on delivery day, they should be consumed immediately.  We do not recommend trying to hold onto your berries for much longer than a day.  Eat em up!  But maybe you don’t need to be told that and they will have all been eaten on your drive home before you’ve even had a chance to read this newsletter!  We recommend making a fresh strawberry cream pie because there are few things in life that are better than fresh strawberries served on top of a lightly sweetened cream cheese folded in with whipped cream on top of a graham cracker crust.  Take it from me!

Sooo....What's in the box????

Strawberries!-  These beauties are at the top of your box so they dont get smooshed and so that they don't get water dripped on them from wet lettuce or other wet veggies.  

Rouxai Red Oakleaf Lettuce or Green Butterhead leattuce-  The lettuces this week are so tender and succulent.  How lucky we are to have all of this buttercruch lettuce so smooth and soft to make gorgeous spring salads with!  We had a very muddy and rainy harvest morning, but we did our absolute best and put a lot of extra effort and time into getting all of the mud off of the lettuce this week.  Will keep best in a plastic bag in the fridge.  

Red Buttercrunch lettuce-  Another fabulous lettuce offering.  This is gourmet stuff here folks!  These lettuces are so tender, I just want to eat salad for every meal.  Think taco salads this week with the cilantro and lettuce combo in the box.  Make chicken salads.  Seven layer salads.  Avocado salads.  Keeps best in a plastic bag in the fridge.  DSC 0175

Garlic Scapes-  These are the long and skinney things that look a bit like a long string bean or somthing, but they should smell stronly of garlic.  These scapes are the garlic plant's effort at making a seed head.  Each garlic plant makes one scape.  If snapped off, the garlic plant will put more of it's energy into making a nice big garlic bulb rather than putting it's energy into making a seed head bulbus.  Fortunatley for us, these scapes are delicious to eat!  Start chopping them up with your knife at the base of the bunch and use the little green chopped pieces like garlic in your soups, stir fries, pastas, eggs or wherever you might ordinarily cook with garlic!  You can also make a garlic scape pesto which has become very popular.  We like the chop up the garlic scapes beginning from the base of the bunch up until the little nodules on the scape-  the rest of the scape is still edible but a little more chewy.  

White and Purple Kohlrabi-  Each member received one white kohlrabi and one purple kohlrabi. Cut the leaves off of the top of the kohlrabi and use them in your cooking like kale.  Using a pearing knife or a small knife, peel the outer edge of the kohlrabi off before you eat it.  These kohlrabis are so mild and tender and have a hint of sweetness to them!  Once a kohlrabi has been cut open, the flavor is best if it is eaten within an few hours.  Also wonderful if chopped into veggie sticks, sprinkled with salt and eaten raw and whole!  Kohlrabi is also called the "ground apple" because its texture is so much like that of an apple.  

Collard Greens-  I knew that you probably could not contain your excitement when you found collard greens, but these truly are a special treat!  If cooked well, collards can be a nutritious and delicious side!  They can be used in cooking a lot like any other cooking green, but they do take a bit longer to cook.  Check out a traditional recipe below.

Cilantro-  The cilantro was showing signs of bolting from all of the heat we had.  We had a lot of it too, so generous bunch sizes this week!  Cilantro typically does not like to get wet.  We did have to wash it since it was such a muddy harvest week.  We recommend using it up as quickly as possible.  Unless you want it to last longer, you could take the rubber band off the bottom of the bunch, wash it again if you think it looks dirty around the base of the rubber band, and then salad spin it good and dry and store it in a plastic bag in the fridge.  

Radishes!-  We never thought we would get another harvest week out of these, but they still looked and tasted amazing.  This will be the final radish giving until fall when the cooler growing temps return.  Great if you cut the tops off of them and let them float in a bowl of water in your fridge and just snack on them throughout the day.  Some people even add them to a stir fry.  Their texture is wonderful when cooked!  Radish greens are so green, mild and nutritious, don't let those go to waste!  

Hakurai Salad Turnips-  These are such a soft and smooth salad turnip!  Great for slicing up thinly and adding to your salads.  Turnip greens could also be added to a quiche and no one would ever notice that they weren't spinach!

Next Week's Best Guess:  Lettuce x2, kohlrabi x 2, dill, swiss chard, broccoli, zucchini, summer squash, strawberries, garlic scapes, peas, maybe green onions

Recipes:

Collards Recipe with Bacon and Potatoes

 Glazed Hakurai Turnips Recipe with greens

No Bake Strawberry Cream Pie

Cilantro Lime Salad Dressing

 

 

June Twenty-Eighth

It always feels strange to have the longest days of the year at the beginning of the season.  It doesn’t feel like the days should start getting shorter again already!  But it does feel like a blessing in some ways.  The darkness is sometimes the only thing that brings a farmer indoors.  When it’s too dark to work, it must be time for the farmer to quit!DSC 0189

In recent years as we have had small children, a more structured routine has settled itself into our lives.  The children demanded a firm dinner, work, family routine that simply was not present before kiddos.  While it can be hard to come inside during good, quality afternoon daylight hours to start dinner, keeping small children fed and on a solid snack/nap/meal/bedtime routine takes precedence for one parent (most often the mom) while the other parent (usually dad) keeps at it in the fields until the crew is gone and then finally called in for supper.  Eat at 6pm.  Kids sleeping by 7:30.  Parents catch up on admin work, straighten up the house, and even have un-interrupted conversations. 

The girls usually wake us up around 6:30am.  Coffee.  Breakfast.  Get dressed.  Baby-sitters and field crew arrive at 8am.  We work until noon.  One hour lunch break.  Back into the fields at 1pm and work with the crew and worker shares until 5, 5:30 or 6pm-depending on the day.  Wednesdays we work until 7:30pm.  Time passes quickly and in the long days of the summer like these, there never seems to be enough of it with so much to do.  We have childcare lined up for the morning shifts each day, while one parent (usually me) watches the girls in the afternoons.  In the afternoons with the girls I am able to do some simple chicken chores, laundry, make dinner and sometimes help the field crew for a bit or for as long as the children last. DSC 0187

Adam has been shouldering the brunt of the strict schedule.  He needs to be prepared each morning to direct a crew, be on time, keep everyone on task and quality check work being done and harvesting.  He has been managing the bulk of the tractor work as well including tillage, planting, seeding and cultivating.  He is even responsible for taking advantage of little windows of opportunity between weather for getting things done such as being on the tractor all weekend cultivating-since that is when it was finally dry enough to catch up on such tasks.

It’s grueling at times, but we actually really love it.  We might get bored otherwise.  We’re accustomed to a pace that ticks a few notches faster than your usual family.  We don’t sit around well and we don’t leave home well.  We do eat well and we have a strong sense of family and home and a deep groundedness that keeps us sane.  This is summer.  The family and the farm and the lifestyle change in the off-season.  We have a tide that we ride that ebbs and flows in a very natural and seasonal rhythm.  While our lives in this moment make feel un-balanced and a little too busy, it is important for us to remember that we will re-claim our sanity and eventually slower pace in the off season.  But for now….Summer has only just started!  DSC 0211

Soooo....What's in the Box????

Salad Turnips-  These are the smaller white turnips bunched with their greens on.  These are nice if sliced very thinly on top of a salad with a mandolin.  The greens are also perfectly edible in any way that you might normally incorporate greens into your cooking.  Omlet with turnip greens?

White and Purple Kohlrabi-  Each member received one white kohlrabi and one purple kohlrabi. Cut the leaves off of the top of the kohlrabi and use them in your cooking like kale.  Using a pearing knife or a small knife, peel the outer edge of the kohlrabi off before you eat it.  These kohlrabis are so mild and tender and have a hint of sweetness to them!  Once a kohlrabi has been cut open, the flavor is best if it is eaten within an few hours.  Also wonderful if chopped into veggie sticks, sprinkled with salt and eaten raw and whole!  Kohlrabi is also called the "ground apple" because its texture is so much like that of an apple.  

Broccoli-  Everyone's favorite!  A broccoli for everyone!  For the sake of your broccoli and strawberries, arrive at your dropsite ASAP!  Broccoli likes to be kept very cold to be stay fresh.  It would also keep best in a plastic bag in the fridge.  

Red Oakleaf or red Buttercup lettuce-  The red buttercups were holding up nicely in the fields and it won't be long before we aren't abe to get these tender varieties of lettuce as the heat season is approaching.  

Romaine Head Lettuce-  This romaine is maybe some of the nicest romaine we have ever grown.  Maybe soil improvement, maybe all the moisture, maybe the new variety, but we are happy with them!  We thought the huge leaves would make nice wrappers for chicken lettuce wraps or a spicy beef wrap.  Romaine is also great for making Ceaser salads with crutons, ranch dressing and chicken!  Yum!  

Strawberry Quarts-  Hurry to your dropsite and save your strawberries from melting.  Eat them up quickly, they are very perishable!

Sweet Peas-  Whaaaaaaaa?  Sweet peas?  .43lbs per member!  There isn't much in life that gets better than fresh-picked sweet peas!  And they have so much flavor!  So sweet!  We're expecting an even bigger giving next week!

Dill-  A super full herb for making fun salad dressings, creamy dips or even soups with.  Dill is also nice dried if you can't use the whole thing.  We recommend laying the bunch out and dehydratig it.  Dill is very alkalizing in the body, so very healthy to eat!  

Swiss Chard-  We couldn't belive how thick, succultent and fresh the stems are on these babies!  Very perfect and gorgeious looking early-season chard!  Yes!  Don't let a leaf go to waste!  Remember that you can use the stalks and stems as well in your cooking!  See recipe below.  

Zucchini and Summer Squash-  The zucchini and Summer Squah are starting!  The production on these goes up and up and keeps on going!  So dust off your old zucchini recipes, here they come!  Zucchini and summer squash are a very watery-soft squash that can be sauteed lightly into stir fries, marrinated and then grilled, or spiralized into a gluten-free pasta.  Zucchini and Summer squash don't have much flavor of their own, so they are great at absorbing the flavors of your home-made dressings.  They can also be used inter-changably in recipes.  The only thing really that differs about them is their color and shape.  

Garlic Scapes-  These are the long and skinney things that look a bit like a long string bean or something, but they should smell strongly of garlic.  These scapes are the garlic plant's effort at making a seed head.  Each garlic plant makes one scape.  If snapped off, the garlic plant will put more of it's energy into making a nice big garlic bulb rather than putting it's energy into making a seed head bulbous.  Fortunately for us, these scapes are delicious to eat!  Start chopping them up with your knife at the base of the bunch and use the little green chopped pieces like garlic in your soups, stir fries, pastas, eggs or wherever you might ordinarily cook with garlic!  You can also make a garlic scape pesto which has become very popular.  We like the chop up the garlic scapes beginning from the base of the bunch up until the little nodules on the scape-  the rest of the scape is still edible but a little more chewy.

Green Onions/Scallions-  The first giving of green onions.  These bunches of green onions are smaller this week.  This is the frist giving of them and the bunch size goes up as they onions grow and they get bigger over the next few weeks.  You can use every part of these onions in your cooking, all th way up to the tips of the greens!  

Next Weeks Best Guess:  Romaine lettuce, green leaf lettuce, bunching onions, zucchini and summer squash, kohlrabi, garlic scapes, broccoli, salad turnips, kale.  

Recipes-

Savory Zucchini and Chard Muffins

Fettuccini with Swiss Chard, Currents, Walnuts and Brown Butter

Sour Cream Veggie Dip with DillSour Cream Veggie Dip with Dill

Crunchy Spring Salad with Dill Dressing

Broiled Zucchini with Yogurt Dill SauceBroiled Zucchini with Yogurt Dill Sauce

 

July Fifth

If you were not part of a CSA farm this season, and unless you’re a hard-core foodie (and I do hope you’re on your way to becoming one), you probably would not have salad turnips, kohlrabi, garlic scapes, dill and fennel in your refrigerator this week. These are out-of-the-norm items that, unless your CSA farmer gives them to you, tells you that is what is in season and encourages you to try new recipes, you might not be eating these things.  But ‘Horray’ for YOU!  You are eating these things, they are local, organic and in season, and I for one, think you’re awesome for doing it!DSC 0357

This is how a CSA season starts out.  Lots of leafy greens, quick Spring crops that can be grown in the midwest like radish, lettuce, kale and so forth to help hold us over until the fun, classic and traditional items like tomatoes, sweet corn, potatoes, onions and green beans can be grown.  You’re feeling proud of yourself for shaving those turnips on top of your salad.  You’re feeling adventurous for trying new Kale and Swiss Chard recipes and you’re feeling progressive for being part of a local, organic farm.  You’re feeling brave for eating those garlic scapes and fennel.  You even feel good in your tummy for getting all of this nutritious stuff into your body!  And if this is your second or third or more year of doing this CSA thing, you’re probably even feeling confident and capable. 

The CSA experience really isn’t even entirely just about the box of food.  With the rise of the well-marketed Hello Freshes and the Blue Apron’s in the world that offer the home-delivered boxes of food with recipe cards, I worry about the loss of ‘community and place’ and ‘local’ and ‘organic’ in these programs.  CSA is also about the place that it comes from and the people who partake in growing it.  For me it is hugely about community and family and eating locally and seasonally.  The Hello Freshes and Blue Aprons are well-marketed, competitive and convenient, but missing all of the golden gems that can be offered inherently in a CSA box share.  CSA is so much more than a box of vegetables and some recipe suggestions. 

These vegetables are grown with love by people who you can contact and at a place you can visit.  When you see that we get rain, you know that your vegetables are getting rain.  When you know it’s been dry, you know the farm needs rain.  When you saw severe storms on the radar, you think of your farm and hope the crops are okay.  When you see the pictures of the workers and the farmers in the fields, you have and intimate association and connection with the food, something that you can only get through CSA, farmer’s markets or growing your own food. DSC 0354

Soooo......What's in the Box?????

Salad Turnips-  These are the smaller white turnips bunched with their greens on.  These are nice if sliced very thinly on top of a salad with a mandolin.  The greens are also perfectly edible in any way that you might normally incorporate greens into your cooking.  Omlet with turnip greens?

White and Purple Kohlrabi-  Each member received one white kohlrabi and one purple kohlrabi-or maybe two purple kohlrabis.  We tried to give everone one of each, but had a few more purples than whites.  Cut the leaves off of the top of the kohlrabi and use them in your cooking like kale.  Using a pearing knife or a small knife, peel the outer edge of the kohlrabi off before you eat it.  These kohlrabis are so mild and tender and have a hint of sweetness to them!  Once a kohlrabi has been cut open, the flavor is best if it is eaten within an few hours.  Also wonderful if chopped into veggie sticks, sprinkled with salt and eaten raw and whole!  Kohlrabi is also called the "ground apple" because its internal texture is so much like that of an apple. 

Broccoli-  Everyone's favorite!  A broccoli for everyone!  Broccoli likes to be kept very cold to be stay fresh.  It also keeps best in a plastic bag in the fridge. 

Red Oakleaf or Buttercup lettuce-  The red buttercups were holding up nicely in the fields and it won't be long before we aren't abe to get these tender varieties of lettuce as the heat season is approaching. 

Romaine Head Lettuce-  This romaine is maybe some of the nicest romaine we have ever grown.  Maybe soil improvement, maybe all the moisture, maybe the new variety, but we are happy with them!  We thought the huge leaves would make nice wrappers for chicken lettuce wraps or a spicy beef wrap.  Romaine is also great for making Ceaser salads with crutons, ranch dressing and chicken!  Yum! 

Sweet Peas-  Whaaaaaaaa?  Sweet peas?  .66lbs per member!  There isn't much in life that gets better than fresh-picked sweet peas!  And they have so much flavor!  So sweet!  We're expecting an even bigger giving next week!

Dill-  A super fun herb for making fun salad dressings, creamy dips or even soups with.  Dill is also nice dried if you can't use the whole thing.  We recommend laying the bunch out and dehydratig it.  Dill is very alkalizing in the body, so very healthy to eat!  This week it is flowering a bit, but the frawns are still perfectly edible even when the plant is at this stage.  

Zucchini and Summer Squash-  The zucchini and Summer Squah are starting!  Three this week.  The production on these goes up and up and keeps on going!  So dust off your old zucchini recipes, here they come!  Zucchini and summer squash are a very watery-soft squash that can be sauteed lightly into stir fries, marrinated and then grilled, or spiralized into a gluten-free pasta.  Zucchini and Summer squash don't have much flavor of their own, so they are great at absorbing the flavors of your home-made dressings.  They can also be used inter-changably in recipes.  The only thing really that differs about them is their color and shape. 

Garlic Scapes-  These are the long and skinney things that look a bit like a long string bean or something, but they should smell strongly of garlic.  These scapes are the garlic plant's effort at making a seed head.  Each garlic plant makes one scape.  If snapped off, the garlic plant will put more of it's energy into making a nice big garlic bulb rather than putting it's energy into making a seed head bulbous.  Fortunately for us, these scapes are delicious to eat!  Start chopping them up with your knife at the base of the bunch and use the little green chopped pieces like garlic in your soups, stir fries, pastas, eggs or wherever you might ordinarily cook with garlic!  You can also make a garlic scape pesto which has become very popular.  We like the chop up the garlic scapes beginning from the base of the bunch up until the little nodules on the scape-  the rest of the scape is still edible but a little more chewy.

Green Onions/Scallions-  The first giving of green onions.  These bunches of green onions are smaller this week.  This is the frist giving of them and the bunch size goes up as the onions grow and they get bigger over the next few weeks.  You can use every part of these onions in your cooking, all th way up to the tips of the greens!  

Lacinato Kale-  Lacinato is probably the most popular and trendy of the kale varieties today.  It is an heirloom variety (meaning open pollinated or not a hybrid).  Lacinato is a darker green than some other varieties of kale and has a smooth texture for cooking.  

Fennel-  Fennel is a vegetable in the umbelifferea family-the same family as carrots, celery, dill, parsley and parsnips (an impressive family, I know!).  It's flavor, when eaten raw resembles licorice.  It is nice eaten raw if shaved very thinly with a mandolin into or onto a salad.  When cooked, fennel looses most of that licorice flavor and looks and tastes a lot like caramelized onions.  There is a small core at the base of the fennel that I like to cut out before eating.  The white bulb of the fennel is most commonly used in cooking, but the stalks and frawns are edible as well if you really love that licorice flavor.  The frawns also make a beautiful garnish.

Next Week's Best Guess:  Lettuce x2, summer squash and zucchini, beets, kohlrabi, green onions, garlic scapes, fennel, sweet peas, broccoli and cauliflower

Recipes:

Cream of Broccoli and Fennel Soup (a long-time favorite of mine)

Spring Salad with Fennel and Orange

Risoto with Sweet Sausage and Fennel

Chocolate Kale Smoothie (Thank you Megan for these awesome Kale Smoothie Recipes!)

Classic Green Monster Smoothie with Kale or Greens

Sun Dried Tomato, Kale, Hemp Pesto (Thank you again, Megan, for this awesome Kale Pesto Recipe)